36

Here is another approach without installing any additional software. Open a terminal session and run one of the following commands: Default Button Style gsettings set org.pantheon.desktop.gala.appearance button-layout close:maximize Max and Close buttons switched gsettings set org.pantheon.desktop.gala.appearance button-layout maximize:close Windows ...


18

Windows You can switch between windows several ways: Click on the window you want to switch to Click on the app's icon in the dock Hover over the app's icon in the dock and scroll up and down Press Alt + Tab To see an overview of your open app windows, press ⌘ + W. You can customize these shortcuts through System Settings → Keyboard → Shortcuts → Windows. ...


14

Yes you can. First you need to install dconf-editor with: sudo apt-get install dconf-tools Once it is installed, open it and search for the entry: org/pantheon/desktop/gala/appearance/button-layout There you'll see the dafault setting: close:maximize you can switch those as: maximize:close to have the close button to the right. You probably need to ...


13

Although disabled by default, you can assign a keyboard shortcut to enable any window to stay on top in Gala. Simply assign your desired key combination to the Toggle always on Top option located under System Settings -> Keyboard -> Shortcuts -> Windows.


9

You can either scroll over the icon in plank, or right-click it for a context menu which includes open windows of the application.


8

I don't think this is possible, and I also don't think it will be a feature that will be implemented in the future. As you may be aware, elementary OS will always try to have the least amount of settings possible to keep the interface simple and clean, so supporting something that only a few will understand and actually use vs confusing or cluttering the ...


8

You can customize this with gsettings in Terminal: gsettings set org.pantheon.desktop.gala.behavior edge-tiling false Use true to revert to default behavior. Or use the graphical dconf Editor. You need to install it if you haven't done it already: sudo apt-get install dconf-tools Once it is installed, open it and search for the entry: org.pantheon....


7

You definitely can for gVim. I think this works on most apps, including ones that don't have a full screen mode, for example System Settings. Open up System Settings and click Keyboard and then check you are on the Shortcuts Tab and Windows is selected in the sidebar: Then click on the "Disabled" text in line with the Toggle Full Screen and press a ...


7

Luís de Sousa answered on Ask Ubuntu: To set a window occupying the left half of the screen use this shortcut: Ctrl + Super + ← For the right half: Ctrl + Super + → Super is the Windows key.


6

You could also install elementary-tweaks sudo add-apt-repository ppa:mpstark/elementary-tweaks-daily sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install elementary-tweaks Open switchboard->Tweaks and change the window buttons there.


6

If you drag the windows to either corner of the screen, they will snap into place. To snap them back to their original size just click and drag away from the side of the screen again.


6

You can deactivate this feature by disabling dynamic workspaces in gala preferences. Open dconf Editor, if you have it, and go to org -> pantheon -> desktop -> gala -> behavior and untick dynamic-workspaces point. Or just run follow command in the Terminal: gsettings set org.pantheon.desktop.gala.behavior dynamic-workspaces false To revert this feature ...


5

Using wmctrl The program wmctrl allows to you to get infos and change the states of currently open windows. Install it by typing sudo apt-get install wmctrl. Type wmctrl -l to output a list of currently managed windows: 0x02e00003 -1 username plank 0x02a00003 -1 username wingpanel 0x0340000a 0 username Home: wmctrl 0x0360000a 0 username Scratch ...


5

By default, elementary OS has a magnifier that can be used by pressing ⌘++ to zoom in and ⌘+- to zoom out. Note that ⌘ refers to the "Super" key, which on your hardware might have a Windows logo, an Ubuntu logo, or the word "Command".


4

IMO this is the single most frustrating bug present in elementary OS. Unfortunately the only realistic current fix for this bug I know about is applying this patch to gala and recompiling it yourself. While the ability to do this is a testament to the power of opensource software, to avoid the headaches I have never gone down this route. It was proposed to ...


4

You achieve that result by setting the "Never hide" option in System settings > Desktop > Dock.


4

I discovered a workaround via this answer to a related question. First, use gsettings to find the internal configuration setting we wish to change: gsettings list-recursively | grep -i switch # ... # org.gnome.desktop.wm.keybindings switch-applications ['<Super>Tab', '<Alt>Tab'] # ... Then, change the individual setting as necessary. In this ...


4

Install tweaker for Loki: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:philip.scott/elementary-tweaks sudo apt update sudo apt install elementary-tweaks Then Appearance - Windows Controls - Layout (Windows, OS X, etc)


4

The same thing also happens with Brave (browser). It's clear that the window is maximized, as the panel at the top becomes black. If you click and drag down just below the black panel, the program window restores to a non-maximized size and becomes visible. If you maximize it again, it'll work correctly until will close the window again.


3

Ahhh sorry, I was already able to find the solution. As long as I disable the setting that windows do not get maximized when its above 70%, the last size is now remembered !! Solution: gsettings set org.gnome.mutter auto-maximize false


3

The solution is to install gtk3-nocsd package and to preload the small library provided by it by adding something like: env LD_PRELOAD=/usr/lib/gtk3-nocsd/gtk3-nocsd.so in front of the command line launching your firefox. The package is found in this repository. More details here. My own configuration for Firefox looks like this: Edited A quicker way,...


3

Disable the second screen monitor in Display settings when it isn't in use. Any windows will be forced to your only screen, and all new windows will stay on this screen. You can also try SUPER+DOWN to view workspaces. You might be able to grab the window there, too. Not a bad first question :D


3

Quick answer to your second question. You can drag a window by clicking anywhere inside of it with the combination Super + left click.


3

For anyone who landed here only interested in switching between windows of the same application, I wrote a python script to achieve this. Gist available here: https://gist.github.com/tysonholub/c737d562614aa0d83add66dbec378723 Please see comments in the code for usage. Note: This script also allows overriding the native switch-windows behavior through a ...


3

Although I did install xbindkeys, I did not install xautomation, which allowed me to automate and assign key combinations like alt+tab. For a detailed explanation, you can follow the link posted by mazienho which gives a good example how xbindkeys and xautomation are working together. In order to achieve what I was looking for, I added the following lines to ...


3

Edit: This is not the correct answer for the above question. When i wrote this i was thinking about tabs of an application and not windows. So, this answer works for cycling through tabs of an app. Ctrl + PgUp/PgDn is the default keyboard shortcut to cycle through windows/tabs in an application. In some applications if Ctrl + PgUp/PgDn doesn't work, try ...


3

The minimum window size (910 x 640 in pixels) is now hard coded into Files as the result of a recent merge, so cannot be changed (except with a bug request, possibly). It was thought to be a reasonable minimum usable size and on my computer occupies less than one quarter of the screen (on Loki with elementary theme). If the window is appearing bigger with ...


3

You can also set a hot-corner to achieve this in the Desktop settings. Then, all you have to do is point the mouse to the corner and the window will minimize. As you can see below, mine is set to minimize with the low right corner of the screen. It's surprisingly effective. And, as a elementary os user for two years now, I can relate to your pain. Not ...


2

It doesn't seems like there is such functionality... instead I can suggest you to use Super + Arrow Down, you'll be able to select the window with arrow keys, and "Select" with Enter button. And, it sounds like a feature request to me :) Submit it to Launchpad as a blueprint?


2

Windows can be forced to open maximised using devilspie2. Install it: $ sudo apt-get install devilspie2 Create the config file: ~/.config/devilspie2/open-apps-maximised.lua Run devilspie2 from the command-line and add it to the list of applications to run on startup. Example content of open-apps-maximised.lua: if (get_window_role()=="pop-up") then ...


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