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6

Go to system settings --> user accounts --> unlock --> Click on + (at left bottom corner). Then add details.


6

This has been answered in another question on another StackExchange site but this is basically what you need to do: While the user you need to modify is logged out and you're logged in as another sudoer user, do the following: sudo usermod -l newUsername oldUsername This changes your username but not your home folder. If you're okay with having a ...


4

How can I add new user to sudoers file? If you wish to create a user with sudo privilege, execute, sudo adduser --ingroup sudo <username> If you wish to add an existing user, execute sudo usermod -aG sudo <username>


4

It is normal for your system to have some system users and system users are usually not listed in the user accounts under system settings. To check them execute the following command in terminal, sudo cat /etc/passwd If you are currently logged in with the root account you can ignore the term sudo which is used to give a user superuser permission.


3

Pretty simple answer for this one. In order to the data be deleted with the removal of the user, one has to click on the delete user (small minus sign at the bottom of the user administration settings) instead of simply blocking the user. That's it.


3

You can customize your guest session under elementary OS. In your case you might only want to copy some of the configuration files of your Administrator account (startup apps, dock apps, etc.) to /etc/guest-session/skel that will be copied for each new guest login. The customization steps for elementary OS are pretty much the same as for Ubuntu: https://...


2

You can try to do so using command line. Here's the help page. In particular you need to use, sudo nano /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf and thereafter, add the following lines, [SeatDefaults] autologin-user=<YOUR USERNAME> autologin-user-timeout=0 user-session=ubuntu greeter-session=unity-greeter This is slightly different than what's mentioned in help ...


2

I guess you need a combination of How do I change my user profile picture? and How can I have the same applications in the Dock for the Guest session as I have in the Administrator account?


2

Try method described here: https://askubuntu.com/questions/351991/mounting-disk-drives-among-different-users. It worked OK for me. Note however that the last command given should be sudo chgrp <groupname> <mountpoint>


1

I have the same issue. The parental control does not do anything. My current workaround is to use ufw. For my son, I wanted him to only be able to get and send email on his own, hence I allowed only outgoing connections to the smtp (587) and imap (993) ports of his email account, as well as to dns (port 53): sudo ufw default deny outgoing sudo ufw default ...


1

System Settings >> User Accounts Unlock in upper right with password. Click on the picture placeholder Navigate to the picture you want to use, and you're all set! https://youtu.be/mFXM00hJxnk


1

The error message means no process is actually using the existing lock file, though its existence prevents your current action from completing. Delete it and try again. sudo rm /etc/subuid.lock


1

Here the goal is to allow new admin to access files whose permissions and ownership are under old admin. In such cases you can do following: change the file ownership or chown user:group filename Add new admin to group old admin


1

I suspect one of the following: logind is not correctly assigning your session a logind session you are not in the adm group polkit is broken for some other reason You can make sure that the second case is not causing an issue by adding your user to the adm group: sudo adduser @USERNAME@ adm (replace @USERNAME@ with your username).


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