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You can use GParted Install it by entering the following command in the terminal: sudo apt-get install gparted Here is a tutorial for formatting your USB flash drive : How to Format a USB Drive in Ubuntu Using GParted Start Gparted. Select the USB drive from the top write drop-down menu. Right click the drive and select format, then check Apply


4

Lack of stability or system performance: Once configured, I don't think so (never experienced some, from OpenSuse in the early days till Arch, Kali and Mint today), except the slower speed while booting and installing because of the usb stick. The company could see it if the boot parameters are changed in the bios, but there could be other ways. Nevertheless,...


3

Right after install, just remove it when the pc goes off during reboot. In general you hit the eject button next to the usb sticks name in files. See screenshot


3

You can install the elementary OS on a separate partition or over free space on the hard drive. You will only need an external storage device to install the OS.


3

The easiest way to format an USB stick on elementary (for now) is to install "Formatter" app from elementary appstore.


3

I think there's nothing wrong with elementary OS, the problem is with your Virtual Box instead. I am guessing your USB (not supported one) is USB 3 and the other one (old one) is USB 2. And you may don't have virtual box extension pack installed. What is abnormal to me is, you are supposed to get some error if you haven't installed that when you created the ...


2

Unfortunately elementary OS doesn't povide an UI to change this kind of options directly. You need to install and run dconf-editor from the official repositories, navigate to org -> gnome -> desktop -> media-handling. Disable the options automount-open and automount, that should do the trick.


2

Install mtpfs (If not installed), this will probably solve the issue. To install open terminal and run: sudo apt install mtpfs


2

I have a booteable usb with elementary OS, and it's fast, light and with no issues. I recommend installing it on a single partition / without swap. The swap partition requires so many hits per use, which eventually damaging the USB in a short period of time, and slows down the performance, since the usb access speed is less than a hard drive or ssd.


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I'm the author of that app. I've updated the app with a new build in tool for restoring USB drives on El Capitan. You can download the latest version here.


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WinUSB can do that. It is a bit buggy but it gets the job done. UNetBootin used to be able to do it too, but I'm not sure if it still works. If both these options don't work, you could install a Windows virtual machine and create the ISO from there. Microsoft profides free Windows VM ISO's for 90 days.


2

Try creating your bootable media with the app Etcher (https://etcher.io/). It has been the only app I have used where the bootable media is recognized in all the hardware I have used it with. Good luck.


2

I can't speak of experience for a real pendrive. However, I have installed elementaryOS just a week ago on an external hard drive. I have to say that it works like charm for the moment. In contrary to a persistent live os which I never made succesfully. But that might be a case of not trying hard enough. Three things come to mind: When installing eOS, I ...


1

the configuration file is at: /FAT32_PARTITION/boot/grub.cfg How I found out where the files are: By looking for the strings I see in the GRUB menu in the raw data on the USB drive, I found that the configuration files are located in a partition called "usbboot", which is FAT32 (the second partition in your screenshot, which is has a different name in your ...


1

just remember that elementary 0.4 Loki doesn't support 32 bit processors


1

Fixed it. I found a bug reported on launchpad that described my problem, it is apparently due to the installer (ubiquity) trying to open a file that it needs super user permissions for. The work around is to run the installer under sudo. To do this I selected "Try elementary without installing". Once booted there is a shortcut with the title "Install ...


1

I have seen this issue pop up a few times when trying to copy items to a USB stick in elementary OS. To solve it, I just make sure I am properly unmounting the USB key before removing it. To unmount the drive in elementary OS please do the following: Open up the Files app Find your drive in the Devices section in the left hand menus of the Files app. ...


1

You can install elementary OS from an usb drive to another one, or from cd/dvd to usb. You must take care making partitions. I recommend you to make two partitions: A "root" (/ ) partition to install the OS A "home" (/home) partition to persistence. Avoid a swap partition, in order to preserve usbdrive life. Choose your usb drive to install Grub. You ...


1

Yes, removable media is getting auto mounted. Contrary to other OS the file manager won't popup if you insert a media. Apparently there is no option to set the default action for audio CDs or DVDs, like open them in VLC or sth.


1

I managed to do it by forcing UEFI in the bios. This starts a different menu early where you I could choose "Try elementary os" and that worked fine. The exact option in the bios is: UEFI/Legacy Boot Priority : [UEFI First] (got other big grub problems after but that's another story)


1

Edited: I am pretty sure that you have it sorted out now. However, just in case...FYI My issue was sorted out with some help from @Jorge R Marin as you can see in the following link. TLP Power Management disables USB devices in my ASUS UX305 ultrabook. Needs restart! Before Edit:Has your problem been solved. I am facing the same issue! This is in addition ...


1

I'm not exactly sure what could be the issue, but try the following: The crash doesn't allow you to do anything ? Can you access the terminal by clicking Ctrl+Alt+F1 ? I think it might be related to your Graphic Card, but it's too early to say. Trying 1) will give a hint, and you might try to see if your WiFi or LAN is connected. If so, you might be able to ...


1

You can't install elementary OS (and any linux OS) in the same USB drive you boot the system. You can install from DVD to USB or from USB to another USB. If you want to create a bootable persistent USB drive with elementary OS, you can see the next entry in my blog: Apuntes sobre elementary OS For more information, you can visit: Ubuntu wiki Download ...


1

HiDPI displays (like the one in your retina Macbook) aren't yet supported by elementary OS. You won't have a good time trying to install on this hardware. As you've noticed, the installer especially doesn't really behave properly here.


1

I highly recommend you learn a lot more about PC and OS's before you install a Linux distro, but here's a quick premier: A PC is the actual physical laptop/desktop An OS is the software layer that coordinates all your hardware in order to run applications (like Word, or Google Chrome) Windows 7/8/10 is an OS, Elementary OS is also an OS Elementary ...


1

It seems that usb-creator and unetbootin from Ubuntu 14.04 repos does not play well with UEFI. The solution is to mount the drive after the process is complete, edit the boot.cfg file under /boot and add persistent to the relevant boot entry at the line: linux /casper/vmlinuz persistent file=/cdrom/preseed/ubuntu.seed


1

You can install Unetbootin from the official repositories. sudo apt-get install unetbootin or you could try the command dd which is installed by default (but should be used with extreme coution!)


1

If it is exfat, you will need to install the files below. Many sd cards seem to have this format by default (out of the box). sudo apt install exfat-fuse sudo apt install exfat-utils


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