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6

This answer is after the discussion in chat Here you have to do two things , 1 . Deleting the /swapspace file created using AU question. 2 . Creating swap in unallocated space. 1 . Open terminal and run the commands: sudo swapoff /swapspace sudo rm /swapspace 2 . Install gparted, sudo apt-get install gparted Note Careful while selecting partition. ...


4

You can check the UUID of your (new) swap space: user@host:~$ lsblk -f -o NAME,FSTYPE,UUID | grep swap ├─sda3 swap ce70123c-6341-4802-9b96-29c39fb4110b You should edit sudo nano /etc/fstab (without the trailing slash) and add the line (make sure you use your UUID): UUID=ce70123c-6341-4802-9b96-29c39fb4110b none swap sw 0 ...


2

You'll want to access the drives when they're not mounted, so install gparted on a "live CD" or thumb drive, where you'll be able to toss your swap on one disk and create one on another. Now to activate the partition Boot up elementary OS again and run sudo gparted. Right-click on the swap drive and go to "Properties". Copy the partition's UUID. Run sudo ...


2

I know that with at least the elementaryOS 5.0 "Juno" install media you are able to create custom partition tables. Proceed through the installation wizard, and when you get to the "Installation Type" screen, select "Something else." From here you can add/remove/change partitions. If you're using a different version or are used to using other tools, you ...


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In fact, having the swap space twice the size of your RAM is only a guideline. Actually with 8 GB of physical RAM you won't need much swap space: you might want to keep the one and delete the other partition. If you want to use swap encryption you should keep the cryptswap if not, keep the other one. However, to hibernate you must have at least the same ...


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Temporary sudo swapoff -a Permanent First we must tell the system not to attempt to mount the swap partition on boot. sudo scratch-text-editor /etc/fstab Comment out (place a # before) or delete the line containing your swap partition which will be similar to this. ... # swap was on /dev/sda3 during installation UUID=3532d79f-8215-435b-b40e-...


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Long boot time can be caused by a lot of things. In first place you should check systemd journal (systemd is operating system initialization program) by using journalctl -b command, which will show last system boot log. Then you can scroll down and look at the timestamps to determine which process takes long time to be completed.


1

Run the following command to get the UUID of your swap partition: ls -l /dev/disk/by-uuid Edit your /etc/fstab and change the uuid # swap was on /dev/sdax during installation UUID=put_the uuid_here none swap sw 0 0 Assign the new uuid ( change sdax with yours) swapoff /dev/sdax mkswap -U put_the_uuid_here /dev/sdax ...


1

As lemonslice said, you need to edit /etc/fstab and not /etc/fstab/. You can use GParted to find your UUID (right click > informations). Then just add a ligne to fstab like this UUID=YOUR_UUID none swap sw 0 0. I made you a screenshot to show you my configuration :


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You run Gparted and create a swap partition in the disk. Right click on that partition >>information tab. There you locate UUID and location (ex. /dev/sda5). Then you open '/etc/fstab' (can be opened with Sketch or Sublime) and modify the lines #swap was on <prev dev location> and UUID=<prev UUID> to new data. Save it (you'll need admin password) ...


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Are you using the UUID in /etc/crypttab in the line of cryptswad1? I think it is a known bug, you can replace the UUID by the device: cryptswap1 /dev/sdaX /dev/urandom swap,cipher=aes-cbc-essiv:sha256 Source: https://askubuntu.com/a/472421


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For posterity, I experienced this issue until I installed zRam, and since then I've had basically unlimited memory capacity.


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