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15

Adding applications to autostart using the GUI Starting applications automatically in elementary OS is as easy as in Windows, if not even easier. Open System Settings Click at Applications and switch to Startup Click at the + button in the lower left corner Choose your application or start typing it's name in the upper textfield. If it's a command, you ...


10

At @Life's suggestion, I checked out this post. The solution was quite easy and worked like a charm (Thanks, @Life!). In the terminal, I typed sudo nano /etc/rc.local which opened that file in the nano text editor. Then, above the exit 0 line, I added rfkill block bluetooth, like so: After saving and exiting nano (Ctrl-X, Y, Enter), then restarting my ...


7

Sure there is! Open System Settings -> Applications -> Startup tab. Click on the + icon in the lower left corner. Find the app you want. Done!


6

This is untested but will probably work. If it doesn't I'll check why. Adapting the base session startup programs may already be enough, those are found in /usr/share/gnome-session/sessions/pantheon.session. Replace gala with the appropriate process name. Looking at cerbere's monitored processes list, it looks like it's currently not restarting the WM. If ...


5

Easy to set up using fstab. Run sudo blkid and you should get something like this: /dev/sda1: UUID="b9377d9b-639f-47da-ae99-efe277eb56b3" TYPE="ext4" /dev/sdb1: LABEL="Backup 1" UUID="6177d371-80e4-49bd-bb77-de269e175c97" TYPE="ext4" Save the UUID of the partition you want to mount. If you are unsure of the partition you want to mount use sudo fdisk -l ...


4

In system settings, choose Applications Click on startup tab In the left bottom corner you will see a '+' button, click it You will find a box to type in a custom command, type in the conky there.


4

If you like GUIs and / or are afraid to access directly the config files, a good option is Gnome Disks. Install via sudo apt-get install gnome-disk-utility You can set to mount at startup like this:


3

Got it working by copying the relevant .desktop file from ~/.local/share/applications/ to ~/.config/autostart. The AppImage I downloaded, when run the first time, gave an option to add shortcut file, which is how the .desktop file got in the local folder. Thanks to this answer.


3

You can install preload and zram-config. It will make it a bit faster and it will use less ram. In Elementary install gnome-system-monitor first to check your ram usage. sudo apt install gnome-system-monitor Open it, got to Resources and see how much ram is using. Now install preload sudo apt install preload If you have a 32 bit machine and less than ...


3

The easy way to mount a filesystem during boot is to list it in /etc/fstab. However, SSHFS is a FUSE filesystem, so mounting it from a system configuration file is tricky: you wouldn't have permission to access it under your account. While it's possible to get this done, it's easier to do the mounting from your account. You can use cron to schedule a task ...


3

This is a bug with DBus - see the answer I posted here. Essentially DBus is preventing everything from starting up, so until that's fixed you need to rename the file causing issues: sudo mv /etc/xdg/autostart/at-spi-dbus-bus.desktop /etc/xdg/autostart/at-spi-dbus-bus.disabled


2

To not see the GRUB menu while booting: Open terminal and run: sudo nano /etc/default/grub Change GRUB_TIMEOUT value to 0 which is 10 by default. Now run sudo update-grub Now reboot. Note: If then you need to change to Recovery mode in some instance just press ESC when elementary starts. Then the GRUB menu will appear giving you the change to select ...


2

I think i know what you mean. Xubuntu is build with the philosophy to let hardware do nothing. elementary os is build with the philosophy to give users the best experience. elementary's philosophy automatically means it will do alot for the user so the user doesn't have to do anything, other than the feature they want. everything that is running in the ...


2

This is controlled via a dconf setting in Loki: gsettings set org.pantheon.desktop.cerbere monitored-processes It should contain plank (the default is ['wingpanel', 'plank']). If plank is not listed, you can just add it: gsettings set org.pantheon.desktop.cerbere monitored-processes "['wingpanel', 'plank']"


2

Install gnome-disks using the command sudo apt-get install gnome-disk-utility The open it using sudo gnome-disks Select the partition you want to mount. Click the gear-icon and the on Edit mount options Disable the automatic mount option and Check the box stating Mount on Startup


2

Rename the io.elementary.appcenter-daemon.desktop to prevent startup. cd /etc/xdg/autostart/ sudo mv io.elementary.appcenter-daemon.desktop io.elementary.appcenter-daemon.desktop.bak


2

So I solved my problem. It turned out I did not actually need to use sudo with these commands. What I did was to save the 2 commands (without sudo) in a bash script in my home folder. Then I gave it permissions to be executed by me and my group. Then, in elementary juno, I went to System Settings > Applications > Startup and clicked the + in bottom ...


1

This is a known bug in dbus. Workaround: sudo mv /etc/xdg/autostart/at-spi-dbus-bus.desktop /etc/xdg/autostart/at-spi-dbus-bus.desktop.backup More info: https://bugs.launchpad.net/elementaryos/+bug/1596377 or https://mail.gnome.org/archives/commits-list/2016-July/msg02793.html


1

Some commands always needed some delay for me, so try adding sleep 3 && before the command. Other option to try is to make a new file in home (eg. Startup.sh). Open it with scratch and instert: #!/bin/bash Your command Make the file executable (e.g. with right click-> properties) and put the location of the file in startup applications /home/...


1

You might want to create a script and add it as a custom startup command. ~/.local/bin/start_xcaliber.sh #!/bin/sh xcaliber --bR=256 --bG=256 --bB=212 --gR=1.04 --gG=0.9600000000000001 --gB=1.01


1

Open Files as root and go to /usr/share/applications/ Find the shortcut you need and open it in Scratch and edit the Exec line with whatever you need. Some applications setup their .desktop files in ~/.local/share/applications/ so you might want to check that folder too.


1

You can install the driver's in runlevel 3. CTRL+ALT+F2 $ sudo init 3 Or if you want to stay at your runlevel but only want to clip off X: $ sudo /etc/init.d/lightdm stop


1

There are different places from where stuff is autostarted. There are /etc/xdg/autostart and ~/.config/autostart that I know of. All the stuff, that's not shown in the Startup list is in /etc/xdg/autostart probably. And the apps that are in the settings list are probably in ~/.config/autostart ~/.config/autostart is for applications that only start on ...


1

I got it working by linking the .desktop file to ~/.config/autostart. I still think it's a bit confusing that the app list in that specific settings page is different than what is shown in the application starter.


1

In some cases installed applications are not present in the available list of applications that can be added to the startup list, but you could just add the path to your application executable into the "command box" (the little box where you can add a custom command to run) /path/to/telegram-folder/Telegram -- Press enter and make sure it is ticked to run ...


1

After making this question I realized that elementary OS can do this via settings, with no need to mess with configuration files. Just go to System settings/Keyboard/Layout and select your desired Capslock behaviour. The bad news is that it doesn't work if you keep the key pressed (as the Backspace key does)


1

These are actually two commands, you might want to create a startup script ~/.local/bin/remap_capslock with the contents: #!/bin/bash setxkbmap -option caps:backspace & xset r 66 set it to executable chmod +x ~/.local/bin/remap_capslock and run this script at startup


1

There is no problem with 1,5k lines in the syslog at startup, it can be absolutely normal. However, there might be some errors that cause slow startup indeed, for finding them you should look more for the time stamps and the log contents (than to the amount of information logged). Looking at your log, it might be the wireless connection or the mount of a ...


1

This will depend on how you're booting into elementary OS. Most of the solutions I found were specific to booting into OS X, so you might have more options if you still have OS X installed and/or are dual-booting. The startup chime should respect the latest software settings. I'd try the following: Mute the audio in OS X and see if the chime plays on ...


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