9

While your other operating system will be intact, updater will install new windows loader and you will have to restore your grub. Meaning that you should have linux live CD / usb at hand to restore grub. Help on how to do this can be found in various places including help ubuntu. Help ubuntu: Recovering Ubuntu After Installing Windows or use Boot Repair ...


7

You don't need to run this as a command during boot, you can achieve read-only mounting via the file /etc/fstab. /etc/fstab contains all filesystems that should be mounted upon boot and that's exactly what you want. It's also possible to add the mount options (for example, ro for read-only) to an /etc/fstab entry. The additional line you need to add to the ...


6

Try adding nomodeset to the boot. Here's how to do it: Press and hold the Shift button which will show you a GRUB screen containing a list of kernels and recovery options. Press e to edit the appropriate kernel. Add the word nomodeset before the words with quiet splash. Press Crtl+X to boot. NOTE: This will only add the nomodeset temporarily. Source: ...


6

This answer is after the discussion in chat Here you have to do two things , 1 . Deleting the /swapspace file created using AU question. 2 . Creating swap in unallocated space. 1 . Open terminal and run the commands: sudo swapoff /swapspace sudo rm /swapspace 2 . Install gparted, sudo apt-get install gparted Note Careful while selecting partition. ...


5

Recommended System Specifications for elementary OS : Intel i3 or comparable dual-core 64-bit processor 1 GB of system memory (RAM) 15 GB of disk space Internet access Download Elementary OS from here Shrink one of your partition in windows (for example shrink 20GB) Boot in to live USB or disk. Now you’ll be asked to choose the ...


4

Finally I found my answer. First I installed Freya in Legacy Mode, after that I converted it to UEFI using boot repair. After installation, I switched bios configuration to UEFI and boot in UEFI mode using Ubuntu Live (or other live media) and I do these steps: In Ubuntu first thing we need to do is remove bios_grub partition using GParted (Just find ...


4

The official installation guide recommends at least 15 GB free space and the installer requires 6.4 GB. The base operating system itself won't take much more space (in fact it most likely takes less space than 15GB), but if you want to install more applications and save some data (e.g. movies or music) on the partition, you should go with a bit more, ...


4

You're booting elementary OS in BIOS/MBR/Legacy mode, which allows only up to 4 primary partitions per disk drive. Booting in EFI/UEFI will allow you to install both OSes in UEFI mode, but you need to recreate the disk's partition table and use the GPT one for this to work, because GPT or GUID Partition Table supports up to 128 primary partitions.If Windows ...


4

Please execute this in your terminal, timedatectl set-local-rtc 1 --adjust-system-clock Do not worry if you see a warning after running timedatectl.


3

Note : This can also be used to reinstall elementary OS. To reinstall skip the partition steps. Partitoning : Before using something else option allocate space to install elementary OS. Open Gparted then select partiton you want to allocate for elementary OS. Right click --> Delete. Step1: Now right click on the partition --> New --> extended partition. ...


3

I just upgraded by replacing my Windows 7 install with Windows 10 (I couldnt just upgrade; long story). I have 3 drives in my setup: 2 for elementary OS and 1 for windows, grub is installed on the root drive of elementary OS. Before the installation I unplugged all non windows drives and I didnt even have to reconfigure grub after the installation. Long ...


3

First off, grub supports rebooting in to a specific OS, so you might want to use that instead. See https://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/43196/how-can-i-tell-grub-i-want-to-reboot-into-windows-before-i-reboot for more details. To add an extra button would require to edit the source code of Pantheon, which would require that you manually compile Pantheon ...


3

If your computer boots straight to Freya: Run: sudo update-grub sudo reboot If not solved, Open terminal and run following commands: sudo mount /dev/sda6 /mnt sudo grub-install --boot-directory=/mnt/boot /dev/sda sudo update-grub Note: In first command /dev/sda6 is freya /root partition. If you are not sure about partitions number use sudo fdisk -l ...


3

Ok so this got it working for me. In the BIOS I kept only Launch CMS enabled (OpROM disabled). Boot menu now has "Windows Boot Manager", the hard drive and the DVD drive. With this combination I boot into Windows 10, install rEFInd and problem solved. If you don't have Windows Boot Manager in your boot menu you have to disable CMS, save and after ...


3

I recommend that you first disable automatic boot repair from a console in Windows: bcdedit /set {current} recoveryenabled No Try now if that has solved your problem. If not, you may have to manually set rEFInd. I had to do it in my Dell pc following the instruccions in the rEFInd website, in the "Alternative Naming Options / Renaming Files Manually" ...


3

If you want to dualboot elementary and Windows you'll have to see the grub menu every time you turn your pc on. However, if you barely use one of those operating systems, you could hide the grub menu and edit a config file every time you want to access the other system. I don't recommend doing this since it's probably not worth the trouble. To hide your ...


2

OK, so the problem is with GRUB. It didn't installed properly during the installation. Why can't you see Linux partitions inside of Windows? Windows does not support ext4 out of the box. ext4 is the most popular file system for Linux. However, you can see your partitions by installing some third party software (not gonna suggest one of them, but you have ...


2

Read this post here: install windows after installing ubuntu This post has good explained answers on how to solve your problem. These answers will also work for elementary as both uses GRUB.


2

The next time you should install the OS's in reverse order:First install Windows then the Linux OS. Then you will have the grub menu when you start the computer. I found a similar question on askubuntu. I did not try it, but it sounds very promising: https://askubuntu.com/questions/6317/how-can-i-install-windows-after-ive-installed-ubuntu It is explained ...


2

There's many solutions for this on the web, I used another one not listed here, that's why my answer. This is the workaroud I used: Install boot-repair Go to Advanced options Look for 'purge grub' option Follow the steps


2

You should be able to just click "Install alongside Windows", without the need for boot repair or any other modification. It's what I did on my most recent installation.


2

This always works for me :- 1. download & create liveimage of supergrub iso. 2. boot super grub. 3. locate bootable OS on the pc. ( if more than one OS on the PC) 4. boot you preferred OS. 5. Login & go terminal as root. 6. usually most people prefer grub on "/dev/sda" but that's no always the case. So select the drive you prefer to install grub on....


2

The Windows installation process generally does mess with Grub, the Linux bootloader. One way to prevent such issues is to install Windows in a virtual machine such as VirtualBox. This answer has more information on how to install Windows and then get your Linux setup working again. If you've already backed up your data, the simplest option might be to do ...


2

Yes, of course :) Just download elementary and make it bootable on USB or CD. Then boot it and click install. Following the instructions, you'll come to step where you can decide if you want to erase whole computer and has only elementary or to istall it alongside other system. Choose installation alongside other system and you'll see a simple partition ...


2

You can't change the partition you're currently using. Try resizing the partition using a live USB.


1

Boot using your live CD. Then you need to run these 3 commands: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair Boot repair will now open. Click on "advanced options" and search for the option that mentions "purge grub". Than click "recommended repair" and follow the on ...


1

I can't comment to say this is probably a duplicate, but you should be able to find the answer here. If that doesn't work, go here. Good luck!


1

Open terminal and run: sudo mount /dev/sda6 /mnt sudo grub-install --boot-directory=/mnt/boot /dev/sda sudo update-grub Note: In first command /dev/sda6 is elementary OS /root partition.Replace 6 with your partition number.


1

My refind config file is this: resolution 1366 768 use_graphics_for linux,grub,windows dont_scan_dirs /EFI/ubuntu,boot,/EFI/freebsd default_selection "Elementary OS" dont_scan_files /EFI/Boot/BOOTX64.EFI menuentry "Elementary OS" { icon /EFI/refind/icons-backup/elementary.png loader /EFI/ubuntu/grubx64.efi options "acpi_backlight=vendor resume=UUID=...


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