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8

You have a couple of PPAs which appear to no longer exist. Both of these PPAs (from compiz and versable) are not default elementary software sources. You can remove software sources with the "Software & Updates" configuration tool. This is accessible either by searching for it in Slingshot or by opening Software Updater and selecting "Settings..." in ...


6

The lines that start with W: are warnings and not directly harmful. You somehow have the package source http://dl.google.com/linux/chrome/deb/stable/main (Google's repository for Chrome) listed twice. You can fix that from the Software Center once you've fixed your other problem. The other problem is that one of the files that the package manager reads ...


6

Install Software Properties sudo apt install software-properties-common


6

0.4 loki You can download the package apt http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/pool/main/a/apt/apt_1.2.15ubuntu0.2_amd64.deb and install via the command line sudo dpkg --install ~/Downloads/apt_1.2.15ubuntu0.2_amd64.deb


6

To solve the problem "public key is not available: NO_PUBKEY A74F73EFFE70B91C", import the key: wget -q "http://packages.elementary.io/key.asc" -O- | sudo apt-key add -


6

Packagekitd is responsible for handling package operations (installation, uninstallation, updating, etc...) for AppCenter. It runs in the background so it can check for updates and await commands to perform actions via AppCenter. There is a command called pkmon that will show you what actions packagekitd is performing in the background if you wanted to ...


4

openjdk8 isn't in the trusty repositories therefore you will have to add another repository: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:openjdk-r/ppa sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install openjdk-8-jdk Source: http://ubuntuhandbook.org/index.php/2015/01/install-openjdk-8-ubuntu-14-04-12-04-lts/


4

apt-get autoremove does not remove old kernels (by design). If you want to free up some space by removing old kernels you have to do this manually, but it's advised that the latest two kernel versions remain. How-to remove old kernels manually Fair warning: You should only mess with kernels (removing as well as manually installing new ones) if there is a ...


4

As per these comments, using --no-install-recommends prevents the extra packages from installing.


4

You should be able to safely run apt-get autoremove, but shouldn't usually need to. It's almost always a bad idea to run commands unless you explicitly understand what they do and how, including any output they post and decisions they ask you to make. However, based on the list of packages you provided, I think executing the command would be safe. ...


4

The main key word/phrase to find solution is are you root ? That means the command needs root privileges to run. From man page of sudo sudo allows a permitted user to execute a command as the superuser or another user, as specified by the security policy. Use sudo to run a command with root privileges. So run sudo apt-get install git


4

The possible fix: sudo apt-get install gksu # If not installed sudo apt-get install libcanberra-gtk-module:i386 # If you get Failed to load module "canberra-gtk-module" error Now gksudo nano /etc/lsb-release The file should be like, DISTRIB_ID="elementary OS" DISTRIB_RELEASE=0.3.1 DISTRIB_CODENAME=freya DISTRIB_DESCRIPTION="elementary OS Freya" ...


4

The quickest way to find such problem is to verify the enabled repositories in /etc/apt/sources.list file directly and don't trust software-properties-gtk GUI tool. trusty-security & trusty-updates should have same component (main universe multiverse restricted) same as in trusty. You have the update channel disabled, if you look for example: ...


4

Run sudo apt-get install --reinstall libssl1.0.0 in the terminal to reinstall the libssl library on system I recommend before deleting a important file always rename it to YOURFILENAME.old or YOURFILENAME.bak. Then if you have problems you can always rename it back to the original name :) So next time don't delete important files like that because you ...


4

Following what I've found about these topics, I think you either need to remove the conflicting package, or you need to overwrite it explicitly (I have no idea why its not an option that pops up while you are trying to install): sudo dpkg -i --force-overwrite /var/cache/apt/archives/appstream-data-pantheon_0.3.0-0~14~ubuntu0.4.1_all.deb (source)


4

Right click on the Files icon in Plank dock, select New Window As Administrator, go to /etc/apt/sources.list.d/ folder and edit the various files there related to each of the errors by changing references from loki release to xenial release. Otherwise, delete the kali repository file, because there isn't a loki or xenial release for it. Kali is a Debian ...


3

Ubuntu itself is apparently working on replacing Deb packages with Snappy apps, and GNOME is working on cross-distro sandboxed applications. I wouldn't be surprised if one of these projects made it into Ubuntu LTS, which could get rolled into Elementary. To be clear, that's 100% speculation on my part. That said, folks from upstream projects definitely are ...


3

Usually packages are held back because they require the installation of new packages or conflict and remove old packages. Typically you should just use the software updater app and it'll do the right thing. If you insist on upgrading through Terminal, you should make note of what packages will be added or removed. You can always search the internet to find ...


3

Fix your Sources If you are seeing the “The update information is outdated.” warning, you should use the Software Updater to check for updates, and install any available. That should get rid of that warning, unless one of the sources you've added is unavailable or unverifiable. In that instance, you should remove the affected sources. Flash is Dead Since ...


3

sudo apt-key adv --keyserver keyserver.ubuntu.com --recv-keys <PUBKEY> where <PUBKEY> is 1F3045A5DF7587C3 in this scenario.


3

I do not have enough rep to comment on answers. So here it goes. That oneliner does the trick for you or anyone in same situation find /etc/apt/sources.list.d/ -type f -exec sed -i.bak -e 's/loki/xenial/' '{}' \;


3

I fix this replacing juno for bionic on /etc/apt/sources.list.d/appcenter.list /etc/apt/sources.list.d/patches.list /etc/apt/sources.list.d/elementary.list to find this list of files you can use sudo grep -R juno /etc/apt


3

Follow this steps Open a terminal, then write and execute (by pressing ENTER) this commands, one at a time: sudo apt install software-properties-common will ask your password sudo add-apt-repository ppa:philip.scott/elementary-tweaks will ask you press ENTER to confirm the installation of the PPA (newer version of add-apt-repository runs apt update ...


2

One may try launchpad-getkeys. Delete all the contents in /etc/apt/trusted.gpg.d/. Add $ sudo add-apt-repository ppa:nilarimogard/webupd8 repository sudo apt-get update your local database Install $ sudo apt-get install launchpad-getkeys Run $ sudo launchpad-getkeys Check $ sudo apt-get update if the error is gone.


2

There are not any plans to switch away from Debian/apt at this time


2

The solution is after discussion in chat. Thanks to @Sneetsher for his assistance/help. The main error: dpkg: error: too-long line or missing newline in `/var/lib/dpkg/arch' The simple command will do the trick: sudo sh -c 'echo -e -n "amd64\ni386">/var/lib/dpkg/arch'


2

sudo apt-get install git then just type your password (invisible). I also installed git with elementary, the same as Ubuntu and works. Also, you can use the root command su (not recomended) instead of sudo but you need to create a password for use su with sudo passwd root


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