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I have partitioned my disks like so. My plan was to install elementary OS Freya on my larger 1TB driver under the 64GB partition. When I go to install it, I get this. My secondary disk is being detected as all free space. Is there something I have to do regarding LDM? Thank you so much!

migrated from askubuntu.com Jul 28 '15 at 19:54

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  • Did you run chkdsk on the NTFS partition after resizing it? Ubuntu live installer's Linux NTFS driver will not mount NTFS partitions that are hibernated or need chkdsk. And after a resize it always needs chkdsk. This is an Ubuntu forum not Elementary. – oldfred Jul 26 '15 at 3:51
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I have already answered a similar question here. If you are running Windows try creating an 'ext4' partition on the unallocated space. I was facing similar problem with Windows 8 but creating a partition beforehand solved the problem. Personally i use Minitools Partition Manager as the windows partition manager does not allow creating an ext4 partition.

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Although I have not tried this in conjunction with Windows 8, I do use this method with Vista and Windows 7. Not saying its the best way, just that it works best for me.

Using Windows disk manager I shrink my partition to create the amount of free space that I want for Linux. I actually make sure I create free space, not another partition but actual free space.

Once that is done I boot up the Linux live disk or installer and tell the distro to use all of the free space. I find distributions like Ubuntu or elementary OS typically identify and automatically want to install into the free space very nicely.

The only thing I would recommend is to have a Windows boot disk/repair disk so that if you need to remove the Linux distribution you can FIRST repair the Windows boot files/partitions. Then once the computer boots from the Windows boot menu (not Grub) then you can just remove the partitions using Windows Disk Manager and expand the Windows partition if so desired.

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