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Had a while ago moved from Xubuntu 16.04 to elementary OS.

On Xubuntu, I had a separate '/home' partition, with a lot of stuff. When I clean installed elementary OS, it didn't erase the '/home' partition, as I was expecting.

Rather, it has created a new '/home' folder on the root partition itself.

  • Is there any way to merge and move it from root, to that separate home partition from xubuntu?
  • Otherwise would not mind if the Xubuntu home needs to be erased to create a new one separate from root. But merging would be neat, though not necessary.

Some notes -

  1. elementary OS root alloted 20gb. So it shares with its own '/home' folder.
  2. '/home' partition from Xubuntu has 20gb of its own.
  3. Had installed eOS by selecting the automatic, "Wipe Xubuntu for a clean elementary OS install" rather than the manual disk partition setup.
  4. Already has a backup of '/home' of Xubuntu.
  5. Has installed GNOME Disk Utitlity.

migrated from askubuntu.com Aug 11 '16 at 14:07

This question came from our site for Ubuntu users and developers.

  • The method linked by @joost is perfect, as of now. One thing to note though, for anyone following the guidelines - this is a very long process. It took my entire day to complete it. It is relatively easier to reinstall and reconfigure. But nevertheless, this method JUST works. – arjun Aug 15 '16 at 13:04
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you can follow these instructions to move your Xubuntu home partition. Instead of creating a new partition you can use the xubuntu one.

Like the article says Rsync can be used to copy the files over to your seperate home partition, but the same command can also be used to merge them. Pay attention however if a file with the same name exists on both the current home and the new home it will always keep the file with the most recent 'last modified' date.

  • Thank you. That did work. However, instead of running sudo rm -rI /old_home, would deleting the folder directly would be same, right? Dont want to mess things up now. – arjun Aug 15 '16 at 13:00
  • you are completely right. The listed command just has some saveguards to protect against mistakes – joost Aug 16 '16 at 18:44

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