0

Asus Z97-A motherboard, secure boot off.

Installing eOS on a dedicated SSD. Windows resides on another separate SSD. Other drives around which contain data.

First install would copy the files then stop at the dreaded "cannot install grub" error, neither on the eOS target drive, or on the Windows drive. I restarted, reformatted the destination drive, partitioned with a 50MB EFI partition and a 10MB Grub partition, / and swap. Install went fine, grub install raised no issues. Grub is now installed on the same drive as Elementary.

First reboot would go straight into eOS, no Grub menu. Tried with boot-repair USB drive, and it says

SFS detected. You may want to retry after converting Windows dynamic partitioning (SFS partitions) to a basic disk

Reboot again, F8 to bring the motherboard's boot menu up. Select Windows drive, log in, check if any of the drives is in Dynamic mode, none of them is.

Log out, back into Elementary, issue an update-grub, it seems ok.

Install TestDisk, check partitions, on the Windows drive the boot partition is marked as a regular NTFS, not a Dynamic Disk.

I'm baffled now. Should I try to reinstall grub on a separate drive?

I can post and fdisk -l one I get back home.

sudo update-grub
Generating grub configuration file ...
Found linux image: /boot/vmlinuz-4.15.0-36-generic
Found initrd image: /boot/initrd.img-4.15.0-36-generic
error: invalid volume.
grub-probe: error: cannot find a GRUB drive for /dev/sda1.  Check your device.map.
Adding boot menu entry for EFI firmware configuration
done

and

sudo sfdisk -l

Disk /dev/sda: 931,5 GiB, 1000204886016 bytes, 1953525168 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0xb501c40d

Device     Boot Start        End    Sectors   Size Id Type
/dev/sda1          63 1953523119 1953523057 931,5G 42 SFS


Disk /dev/sdb: 238,5 GiB, 256060514304 bytes, 500118192 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x3c87fd1e

Device     Boot     Start       End   Sectors   Size Id Type
/dev/sdb1  *         2048   1026047   1024000   500M  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sdb2         1026048 499135755 498109708 237,5G  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sdb3       499136512 500113407    976896   477M 27 Hidden NTFS WinRE


Disk /dev/sdc: 119,2 GiB, 128035676160 bytes, 250069680 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: 365DFA1E-9F1E-41B6-A495-C30B6F1CA4AB

Device       Start       End   Sectors   Size Type
/dev/sdc1  4040704   4139007     98304    48M EFI System
/dev/sdc2    20480     40959     20480    10M BIOS boot
/dev/sdc3    40960   4040703   3999744   1,9G Linux swap
/dev/sdc4  4139008 250068991 245929984 117,3G Linux filesystem

Partition table entries are not in disk order.


Disk /dev/sdd: 223,6 GiB, 240057409536 bytes, 468862128 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: C768B16A-F5D0-434E-9B17-86680256E78D

Device     Start       End   Sectors   Size Type
/dev/sdd1   2048 468860927 468858880 223,6G Microsoft basic data
0

Tried disabling fast startup on Win10 ?

0

Try to unhide grub menu.

  1. Open /etc/default/grub as sudo
  2. Set GRUB_TIMEOUT_STYLE=menu (instead of hidden)
  3. Open terminal and do: sudo update-grub
  4. Reboot and you should see Grub menu. Select Windows and see if it boots.
0

Problem solved. boot-repair just stops and warns if any Windows drive is in SFS mode, or Dynamic mode, not just the ones you are trying to install Grub into.

Just set the the Windows drive as boot drive in the bios, log in, reformat the drive as non dynamic, restart with boot-repair, repair, and voilà.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.