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So I want to find out if it is possible to install elementary with apps from the app center and customize the settings and create a installer and use this custom installer on clients computers to save time.

What are the legal issues of doing this all core files would be the same it is just adding programs and updates to the distro?

Also which program does elementary os recommend for doing this as I know a few.

closed as off-topic by Hasan Aug 26 at 16:19

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EOS doesn't (as far as I'm aware) have an OEM install mode at this point, however there is work underway to support showing OEM info:

There is work going on to support OEMs though:

https://github.com/elementary/switchboard-plug-about/issues/9

The legal issues depend on what you want to do, you can freely distribute most Linux software. There might be some applications that have a prohibitive licence (check that case by case). If you have a lot of the same machine to target, you can always create a disk image, and flash all of the computers with an image rather than an installer.

Hope you are able to do what you need.

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I have a process that achieves this result, but I don't use a custom ISO.

I install elementary using the standard Loki (0.4.1) ISO, then I run a bash script that I have created after install. It does things like:

  • Update and upgrade
  • Remove default applications I don't want/need
  • Install all new applications
  • Make changes to config files (things like fstab optimisations, Vim, TaskWarrior, Git, SSH, Gimp etc)
  • Mask services that aren't needed
  • Apply Papirus icons
  • Probably more things that I can't remember.

This is a very quick process. You just install like you would normally, then run the bash script, and let it do its thing.

  • Do you mind sharing that script? Just curious to see which changes you're doing. – m-p-3 Aug 13 '18 at 18:08

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