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Can say the same thing for other distros. Clearly, I'm not that knowledgable in the Linux scene. They are completely reformatting / removing all datas anyway. They do it manually and it can't be just preference because doing a tutorial, the "Erase Disk" option is much simpler. (Yes I know the manual is easy to do but it is just adding more steps).

So what gives? What is wrong with the "Erase Disk and install X"? The tut videos don't even explain, they just "Don't go for "Erase Disk", click "Something Else" then do this".

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    "Erase Disk and Install Elementary" will do what it says: erase your disk. Use it only if you do not need any existing partitions, operating systems and stored data. – user170 Feb 27 '17 at 14:37
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The "something else" option just gives you more refined control over your partition scheme. For example if you didn't want one single / partition but wanted to have a separate home partition or whatever. Also if you wanted to change the size of your swap partition or remove it completely. You can also change the default Ext4 to another type of file system via this method.

For beginners and those who don't need to do any manual configuration of partitions and file system the "Erase Disk and Install Elementary" is just fine.

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    >"Erase Disk and Install Elementary" is just fine. Thank you for saying that and sorry for my dumb obvious question. It's just that the tut vid I watched dodging the "Erase Disk..." option was quite sketchy, made me a bit paranoid. I thought it might leave some things behind. Thank you again. – Mabaet Feb 27 '17 at 14:33
  • it goes back to the older days of linux when the only option was to manually configure your partition scheme. It's much easier nowadays. There's nothing wrong with letting elementary configure it for you. I've been running linux for 17 years and I go with the simple option :) – Pretzel Jones Feb 27 '17 at 15:28
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If you have a previously loaded Ubuntu which is common for distro hoppers. it will give you an option to delete the previous partition of ubuntu and install a fresh copy. This is preferred if you have a dual boot windows. One of my friends deleted windows this way.

Choosing this method will delete your home directory. I usually opt for this installation, copy/save my home directory beforehand and then copy it back after the install. All software will be deleted as well and must be re-installed.

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