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Installed for eOS has an option to "Erase Ubuntu16.10 and reinstall" - this will delete my previous Ubuntu and install eOS without touching my Win7 correct? I am okay with losing everything on the Ubuntu partitions but not the one with Win7 on it.

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Here is my current setup:

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Thank you.

  • No, I don't think you should select the first option. I think 'Erase' will also erase Win7. - You should use the last more advanced option, after being sure you know what you do. -That is, the last option: 'Something else', then install elementary on the Ubuntu partition. – user170 Feb 21 '17 at 9:53
  • I know that it usually erases the whole disk when selecting that option -- but it seems that the installer is detecting that I already have Ubuntu and maybe want to reinstall as there is 3 options. 1. Erase Ubuntu16.10 and reinstall. 2. Erase disk and install ElementaryOS. 3. Something else. Thanks for your answer. – Nathan Feb 21 '17 at 10:01
  • The elementaryOS installer is the same as that of Ubuntu 16.04. Take alook here; linuxtechi.com/install-ubuntu-16-04-with-screenshots. I personally only use the / mountpoint. - Also note you don't need to remove Ubuntu. You can create a new partition for elementary and use both - beside Win7. – user170 Feb 21 '17 at 10:03
  • Thank you for editing that -- imgur.com/a/ldorj this is the installation options that I have. If you're not sure about that option, in "something else" if I reformat everything to fresh /, /home, and swap same as when I initially set up Ubuntu it should work right? I'm sorry I'm so new at this whole thing -- I just thought that option in the installer might save me from messing it up. Thank you. – Nathan Feb 21 '17 at 10:12
  • I asked on Ubuntu and they directed me here. – Nathan Feb 21 '17 at 10:12
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You should use the last (Something else) option.

The first option should be fine in Loki (the old bug mentioned in my comments above should be fixed by now in 14.04 and not affect 16.04 and Loki at all, but I cannot confirm that). (I have posted a question on that: Is the ubicuity bug 1265192 (or similar) affecting Loki installer?)

You have too many data on your drive to risk it without full backup.

You should consider backup in all cases given that a lot of risk is involved in partitioning.

Considering our exchanges in comments and the links I have posted there on whether you should use or not a separate /home partition - and especially considering your setup:

  • You can have two partitions / and /home for elementary as you had for Ubuntu. As you said, you can remove them and create new ones as you did for Ubuntu; but you also have other options; for example, the separate /home partition is not at all a necessity; see below.

  • If you want a separate /home partition; I think you said in a comment you want to get rid of your old settings; then you should not keep the ubuntu /home partition, but replace that too with a new one.

  • In fact you could keep your old Ubuntu home partition by not deleting it and by just setting the /home mount-point to that partition when you install elementary, but then you would also keep the settings from your Ubuntu system in the newly installed elementary. That depends on what you need.

  • You can if you want use only one single / partition instead of the two (after deleting those). See the pro and cons here. (I personally am skeptic as to the usefulness of the separate home partition; more here: Is it safe to only have one partition (/) per system?).

  • Keep the swap partition as it is.

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In my opinion, keep your Ubuntu there, do not install elementary. Because you cannot upgrade elementary OS without reinstall it. I cannot stand this. So I leave elementary OS.

And if you still want to install I suggest you

  1. quiting the installation go to your Ubuntu,

  2. view your partition in your disk(search it on-line), and remember it,

  3. Go back to install elementary And Choose last option

  4. Erase the partitions except the /home and Windows partitions

And remember when you install a Linux distribution, no matter what distribution it is set your partitions by your self. You can get the partitions knowledge easily like partition scheme

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