Bounty Ended with 50 reputation awarded by r3bl
3 deleted 9 characters in body
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Please keep in mind I'm no expert: I gathered some information about closed source software, but I cannot warrant forguarantee completeness or even genuine truth.

  • GLib, GTK+, Granite and Vala are licensed under the LPGL. There is a TL;DRHere is the TL;DR for this license. When your application is dynamically linked to these libraries (which is default when you build an application for elementary OS / Linux in general), you do not have to disclosuredisclose your source code:

    Derivative works (including modifications or anything statically linked to the library) can only be redistributed under LGPL, but applications that use the library don't have to be.

  • While the basic libraries I mentioned (which are necessary for creating an elementary OS app) are licensed under LPGL, others might not. So if you are looking for advanced functionality in additional libraries, you should be really careful about the GPL license. The GPL itself requires you to open your source code for every owner of your application and it "infects" software which is using it. So you'd have to release your app under the GPL as well.

  • Some GPL-licensed projects do provide a GPL linking exception. So, if in doubt, message the developers and ask about their stance.

    Some GPL-licensed projects do provide a GPL linking exception. So, if in doubt, message the developers and ask about their stance.

One thing you should keep in mind though: Linux users are used to open source software. While the closed source state of some software is accepted / tolerated for various reasons (for example nVidia/AMD drivers or Google Chrome), people might reject the idea of a "simple" application being closed source.

Please keep in mind I'm no expert: I gathered some information about closed source software, but I cannot warrant for completeness or even genuine truth.

  • GLib, GTK+, Granite and Vala are licensed under the LPGL. There is a TL;DR for this license. When your application is dynamically linked to these libraries (which is default when you build an application for elementary OS / Linux in general), you do not have to disclosure your source code:

    Derivative works (including modifications or anything statically linked to the library) can only be redistributed under LGPL, but applications that use the library don't have to be.

  • While the basic libraries I mentioned (which are necessary for creating an elementary OS app) are licensed under LPGL, others might not. So if you are looking for advanced functionality in additional libraries, you should be really careful about the GPL license. The GPL itself requires you to open your source code for every owner of your application and it "infects" software which is using it. So you'd have to release your app under the GPL as well.

  • Some GPL-licensed projects do provide a GPL linking exception. So, if in doubt, message the developers and ask about their stance.

One thing you should keep in mind though: Linux users are used to open source software. While the closed source state of some software is accepted / tolerated for various reasons (for example nVidia/AMD drivers or Google Chrome), people might reject the idea of a "simple" application being closed source.

Please keep in mind I'm no expert: I gathered some information about closed source software, but I cannot guarantee completeness or even truth.

  • GLib, GTK+, Granite and Vala are licensed under the LPGL. Here is the TL;DR for this license. When your application is dynamically linked to these libraries (which is default when you build an application for elementary OS / Linux in general), you do not have to disclose your source code:

    Derivative works (including modifications or anything statically linked to the library) can only be redistributed under LGPL, but applications that use the library don't have to be.

  • While the basic libraries I mentioned (which are necessary for creating an elementary OS app) are licensed under LPGL, others might not. So if you are looking for advanced functionality in additional libraries, you should be really careful about the GPL license. The GPL itself requires you to open your source code for every owner of your application and it "infects" software which is using it. So you'd have to release your app under the GPL as well.

  • Some GPL-licensed projects do provide a GPL linking exception. So, if in doubt, message the developers and ask about their stance.

One thing you should keep in mind though: Linux users are used to open source software. While the closed source state of some software is accepted / tolerated for various reasons (for example nVidia/AMD drivers or Google Chrome), people might reject the idea of a "simple" application being closed source.

2 various minor tweaks (capitalization, markup, punctuation, etc.)
source | link

Please keep in mind I'm no expert, but: I gathered a fewsome information about closed source software;software, but I cannot warrant for completeness or even genuine truth though.

  • GLib, GTK+, Granite and Vala are licensed under the LPGL. There is a TL;DR for this license. When your application is dynamically linked to these libraries (which is default when you build an application for elementary OS / Linux in general), you do not have to disclosure your source code.

    GLib, GTK+, Granite and Vala are licensed under the LPGL. There is a TL;DR for this license. When your application is dynamically linked to these libraries (which is default when you build an application for elementary OS / Linux in general), you do not have to disclosure your source code:

    Derivative works (including modifications or anything statically linked to the library) can only be redistributed under LGPL, but applications that use the library don't have to be.

Derivatives works (including modifications or anything statically linked to the library) can only be redistributed under LGPL, but applications that use the library don't have to be.

  • While the basic libraries I mentioned (which are necessary for creating an elementary OS app) are licensed under LPGL, others might not. So if you are looking for advanced functionality in additional libraries, you should be really careful about the GPL license. The GPL itself requires you to open your source code for every owner of your application and it "infects" software which is using it. So you'd have to release your app under the GPL as well.

    While the basic libraries I mentioned (which are necessary for creating an elementary OS app) are licensed under LPGL, others might not. So if you are looking for advanced functionality in additional libraries, you should be really careful about the GPL license. The GPL itself requires you to open your source code for every owner of your application and it "infects" software which is using it. So you'd have to release your app under the GPL as well.

  • Some GPL-licensed projects do provide a GPL linking exception. So, if in doubt, message the developers and ask about their stance.

One thing you should keep in mind though: Linux users are used to Open Sourceopen source software. While the Closed Sourceclosed source state of some software is accepted / sufferedtolerated for various reasons (for example nvidianVidia/AMD drivers or Google Chrome), people might reject the idea of a "simple" application being Closed Sourceclosed source.

Please keep in mind I'm no expert, but I gathered a few information about closed source software; I cannot warrant for completeness or even genuine truth though.

  • GLib, GTK+, Granite and Vala are licensed under the LPGL. There is a TL;DR for this license. When your application is dynamically linked to these libraries (which is default when you build an application for elementary OS / Linux in general), you do not have to disclosure your source code.

Derivatives works (including modifications or anything statically linked to the library) can only be redistributed under LGPL, but applications that use the library don't have to be.

  • While the basic libraries I mentioned (which are necessary for creating an elementary OS app) are licensed under LPGL, others might not. So if you are looking for advanced functionality in additional libraries, you should be really careful about the GPL license. The GPL itself requires you to open your source code for every owner of your application and it "infects" software which is using it. So you'd have to release your app under the GPL as well.
  • Some GPL-licensed projects do provide a GPL linking exception. So, if in doubt, message the developers and ask about their stance.

One thing you should keep in mind though: Linux users are used to Open Source software. While the Closed Source state of some software is accepted / suffered for various reasons (for example nvidia/AMD drivers or Google Chrome), people might reject the idea of a "simple" application being Closed Source.

Please keep in mind I'm no expert: I gathered some information about closed source software, but I cannot warrant for completeness or even genuine truth.

  • GLib, GTK+, Granite and Vala are licensed under the LPGL. There is a TL;DR for this license. When your application is dynamically linked to these libraries (which is default when you build an application for elementary OS / Linux in general), you do not have to disclosure your source code:

    Derivative works (including modifications or anything statically linked to the library) can only be redistributed under LGPL, but applications that use the library don't have to be.

  • While the basic libraries I mentioned (which are necessary for creating an elementary OS app) are licensed under LPGL, others might not. So if you are looking for advanced functionality in additional libraries, you should be really careful about the GPL license. The GPL itself requires you to open your source code for every owner of your application and it "infects" software which is using it. So you'd have to release your app under the GPL as well.

  • Some GPL-licensed projects do provide a GPL linking exception. So, if in doubt, message the developers and ask about their stance.

One thing you should keep in mind though: Linux users are used to open source software. While the closed source state of some software is accepted / tolerated for various reasons (for example nVidia/AMD drivers or Google Chrome), people might reject the idea of a "simple" application being closed source.

1
source | link

Please keep in mind I'm no expert, but I gathered a few information about closed source software; I cannot warrant for completeness or even genuine truth though.

  • GLib, GTK+, Granite and Vala are licensed under the LPGL. There is a TL;DR for this license. When your application is dynamically linked to these libraries (which is default when you build an application for elementary OS / Linux in general), you do not have to disclosure your source code.

Derivatives works (including modifications or anything statically linked to the library) can only be redistributed under LGPL, but applications that use the library don't have to be.

  • While the basic libraries I mentioned (which are necessary for creating an elementary OS app) are licensed under LPGL, others might not. So if you are looking for advanced functionality in additional libraries, you should be really careful about the GPL license. The GPL itself requires you to open your source code for every owner of your application and it "infects" software which is using it. So you'd have to release your app under the GPL as well.
  • Some GPL-licensed projects do provide a GPL linking exception. So, if in doubt, message the developers and ask about their stance.

One thing you should keep in mind though: Linux users are used to Open Source software. While the Closed Source state of some software is accepted / suffered for various reasons (for example nvidia/AMD drivers or Google Chrome), people might reject the idea of a "simple" application being Closed Source.